It is rare to see such emotional vulnerability in the world. In theatre, usually someone is ‘playing’ a character. There is a subtext that the character is imagined, or that it is some kind of creation of a writer, a director, a producer, and an actor.

I am not saying that is a bad thing, but usually, the emotional reality of the person being portrayed in a film, or in theatre is removed by a degree of production.

This show was not like that at all. In The Aspie Hour, the actors opened up and gave a very moving account of what it is like to live on the Autism spectrum, or with Asperger’s Syndrome.

So much so, that I retreated into the depths of my own social self consciousness, after the show finished.

They did it with so much humour though, and it really was a great piece of musical theatre.

It reminded me of the saying ‘be kind, and don’t judge, because you don’t know what struggles a person is facing right now.’

It is actually really good to confront the awkwardness that is in each of us, from time to time. And Mistress Butterfly may have looked at me strangely when we parted company for the evening, but she has absolutely no idea what kind of day I have had.